BIO


 
 

I am an Assistant Professor of Management and Organizations at the Stephen M. Ross School of Business, University of Michigan, and study the psychology of social- and self-narratives, lay theories, and behavioral ethics.  I employ a multitude of methodological approaches, including lab and field experiments, surveys, and interviews.

I received a PhD in Public Policy at Harvard University in March 2015, where I was trained in organizational behavior, psychology, and behavioral economics.  I am also a Non-resident Fellow at Harvard's Ash Center for Democratic Governance and Innovation, and was selected as a 2014-2015 Lab Fellow in Institutional Corruption at the Edmond J. Safra Center for Ethics and a 2013-2014 Research Fellow in Women and Public Policy Program.  

I teach BBA, MBA, and executive education courses on organizational behavior, leadership/teams, and negotiation.  My teaching reinforces a strong focus on experiential learning, and applies research in a manner that is directly useful to students.  In addition to research and teaching, I appreciate and value mentoring emerging researchers and contributing to the field of management and psychology.  

I hope to promote the use of scientific evidence in diagnosing and addressing critical problems in public policy and business practices.  To that end, I have conducted research with governments, companies, and non-profit organizations, and have also been involved with the Behavioral Insights Group (BIG) at Harvard University, and Decision Lab at the University of Michigan.